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Simfin

esafety and digital citizenship specialist

 Tagged with password


08 June 2016

With vast swathes of data being sold on the dark web in recent weeks following high-profile breaches, many sites are encouraging users to change their passwords, even if they weren't directly affected.

Facebook and Netflix appear to be taking this a step further with reports a number of users are being forced to update their credentials.

 

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06 June 2016

WIRED asked a field of password security experts for their favorite unexpected advice, the best practices that might save you the most headache in the long run. Here are seven tips and tricks to keep your digital locks secure.

No, don't make people change their password every month)

Read the article here

 

 

02 June 2015

There are times when we may feel the world is full of antisocial people who feed upon the hatred and distress they share and cause. As a teacher, with a responsibility for the safeguarding and well being of the children in your care, cyberbullying will almost certainly be, at best, a low level distraction and at worst, lead to self harm, and the involvement of social services and law enforcement.

This resource contains a password security poster for you to print out and Teacher Notes containing tips and advice on cyberbullying and password security.

12 March 2015

 This document, by the NEN, is intended for school senior leadership teams and provides an overview of what needs to be in place to keep school networks secure.

The 10 steps described here are adapted from the 2012 CESG document 10 Steps to Cyber Security. CESG is the information security arm of Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ).

Make sure you understand where the responsibilities for maintaining all these systems and processes reside: some may be maintained in-house while others may be provided by your broadband supplier or another third party.

 

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14 October 2014

 Passwords are a blessing and a curse. They allow us to pay for things online and to guard our personal information. But as techniques for cracking them become ever more sophisticated, it's becoming harder to remember and manage all the passwords we need.

For one thing, you really shouldn't use the same password for more than one account. If a hacker is able to break into one of your accounts, they'll try that password with others. Or if one site springs a leak, such as Sony's PlayStation in 2012, hackers can have a field day trying the leaked passwords on other sites. You might not feel too security conscious about some of the sites you use (forums, for example, where no money changes hands), but if you've used the same or a similar password on a more important site, like a shop or your bank, it's like leaving your front door open.

 

Read more here