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Simfin

esafety and digital citizenship specialist

 Tagged with privacy


15 April 2019

There has been many incidents in recent years similar to this.

Over the weekend, news outlets reported that a New Zealand man named Andrew Barker had found a camera, hidden in a smoke detector, in his Airbnb that was livestreaming a feed of the living room. Barker was in Cork, Ireland, on a 14-month trip around Europe with his family when they checked into the rental house. Once they unpacked, Barker, who works in IT security, conducted a scan of the Wi-Fi network and found a camera the owner had not mentioned. He was then able to connect to the camera and view the live feed.

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11 April 2019

When Amazon customers speak to Alexa, the company’s AI-powered voice assistant, they may be heard by more people than they expect, according to a report.

Amazon employees around the world regularly listen to recordings from the company’s smart speakers as part of the development process for new services

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28 March 2019

Love it or hate it, parents have made their way on to social media, and seem to be there to stay.

It's a great way of staying in touch - and it's always amusing watching your parents attempt to take selfies or use emojis.

But if they share photos of you online without your permission - and have no understanding of privacy settings - have they crossed the line?

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05 February 2019

When she was 14, Megan Hinton was tricked into sending a naked photo of herself over social media and suffered abuse at school as a result.

She was trying to fit in at a new school, after being bullied at her previous one.

Read more and watch the video

26 January 2019

A study from researchers at the University of Vermont and the University of Adelaide found that access to as few as eight of our contacts is enough to enable predictive or machine learning technologies to achieve up to 95% accuracy in guessing what a person will post.

From an abstract of the study, titled “Information flow reveals prediction limits in online social activity” and published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour on Monday:

Information is so strongly embedded in a social network that, in principle, one can profile an individual from their available social ties even when the individual forgoes the platform completely.

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