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Simfin

esafety and digital citizenship specialist

Naace Impact Award Winner for Leadership

For his commitment to ensuring a safe and supportive learning environment for the education sector

What people say about simfin

  • As computing coordinator at a special school, with many vulnerable pupils, Simfin is my go to place for up to date, straight talking, clear information on esafety and safeguarding. Highly recommend anyone involved in education to follow this page and if you need training and information, Simfin is your man!

    Computer Coordinator - Special School Online

 Tagged with privacy


05 August 2016

Actor and campaigner Rashida Jones recently produced the documentary Hot Girls Wanted (2015) about the conveyor belt of the 'amateur' porn industry, and how much more easily young women can become involved in it since the internet savvy generation came of age.

The film had begun life as an exploration of the male consumption of pornography on college campuses. However, the makers of the documentary were drawn to the other side of the process, and began investigating why and how many young women become involved in sharing images and films of themselves on the internet.

Users on Reddit have been posting about their experiences from this perspective, specifically what its like to be recognised by strangers from the internet.

 

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18 July 2016

The Pokémon Go Terms of Service, as published by developer Niantic Labs, include a restrictive forced arbitration clause that both takes away the user’s right to file a lawsuit against Niantic, but also bars the user from joining others in any sort of class action against the company.

 

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18 July 2016

The launch of Pokemon GO highlights various privacy, security, safety, and privilege concerns with how we use and access tech. While these concerns existed prior to Pokemon GO, and will continue to exist long afterwards, this provides an opportunity to highlight some concrete steps about how we can use technology more safely, and take control over data collected about us.

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14 July 2016

'Like most apps that work with the GPS in your smartphone, Pokémon Go can tell a lot of things about you based on your movement as you play: where you go, when you went there, how you got there, how long you stayed, and who else was there. And, like many developers who build those apps, Niantic keeps that information'

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