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Simfin

esafety and digital citizenship specialist

 Tagged with parents


19 February 2016

Not everything online is evil, nor does danger lurk behind every new app that comes to market. But keeping up with your teens' and preteens' online activities is much like trying to nail jelly to the barn door -- frustrating, futile and something bound to make you feel inept.

Keep in mind that no app poses a danger in and of itself, but many do provide kids with an opportunity to make, ahem, bad choices.

Read the article

19 January 2016

If you’re worried about anything you or your child come across online, you should report it immediately to the relevant organisation and to the site where you or your child saw it.

 

The links take you directly to the report pages of organisations who can offer advice. You can also report problems directly to social networking sites.

 

Learn more here

07 January 2016

This year’s theme for Safer Internet Day is ‘Play your part for a better internet’. These resource packs for 3-11 year olds (primary) and 11-19 year olds (secondary), as well as the parent and carer pack, provide lots of great ideas to help schools, youth groups, libraries and other organisations get involved in Safer Internet Day 2016.

 

Read more

02 October 2015

'It’s never been more important to make sure you are helping to keep your child safe in the digital world. Our simple guide will help to put you in control and help you and your
children understand dangers of sexting and cyberbullying as they head back to school.'

Download the guide by Internet Matters here.

07 September 2015

Parent Info provides high quality information to parents and carers about their children's wellbeing and resilience. Schools can host the content on their own website and use it in any other ways (in letters to parents etc) that they want.

This service is free and ranges across a wide range of subject matter, from difficult topics about sex, relationships and the internet or body image and peer pressure to broader parenting topics like ‘how much sleep do teenagers need?’

In line with CEOP’s Thinkuknow programme, some of the content covers internet safety, but it all starts from the assumption that young people make little distinction between their online and offline lives and the issues for parents are often the same. The aim is to help parents help their children be discriminating, web-literate and resilient.

 

Go to the site