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Simfin

esafety and digital citizenship specialist

Young People News

03 September 2015

A boy who sent a naked photograph of himself to a girl at school has had the crime of making and distributing indecent images recorded against him by police, the BBC has learnt.
The boy, aged 14, who was not formally arrested or charged, could have his details stored for at least 10 years.
The information could also be disclosed to future employers, his mother said.

 

Read the article and listen to the interview here

18 December 2014

A police investigation is under way after it was revealed dozens of secondary school pupils have been targeted in a string of "sexting" attacks.

Detectives are examining four separate allegations that both boys and girls have been sent explicit images via mobile phones and social networking sites and asked to send them back in return.

 

Read the article here

12 August 2014

Researchers at Microsoft and Ottawa's Carleton University set out to to take a cold hard look at passwords and here's what they found: the way we traditionally measure password strength is inconsistent—and often say nothing about how hard it might be to guess a password.

Here's an example: some systems force you to chose an eight-character password, using capital letters, numbers and at least one number. That sounds pretty secure, but it's not. The word P@ssw0rd fits these criteria and password cracking tools such as JohntheRipper or hashcat will guess it in minutes. That's because they use something called "mangling rules" which take dictionary words and substitute letters such as a for @ or s for $.

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31 July 2014

 A schoolgirl has received a police caution after texting an explicit photograph of herself to her boyfriend, it has emerged.

The teenager sent the image via her phone, but after the couple had a row, he forwarded it to his friends.

Police were called in because she was under the age of 18 and therefore both were committing an offence of distributing an indecent image of a child.

 

Read the article here.

23 May 2014

Facebook announced a new feature for its Facebook app that can automatically identify music and TV shows playing in the background as you're writing a status update. When you activate it, the opt-in feature uses your smartphone's microphone to scan your surroundings; you'll see a sound icon moving on the screen as it does. If the Shazam-like feature finds a match, you can share songs or shows with your friends as part of your update.

Read more here